Ashley Berke: Finding Joy in a Communications Career

Ashley Berke has used her communications savvy to elevate the profiles of world-renowned institutions.

Currently, as VP of communications for The Philadelphia Orchestra, she is responsible for sharing the music and stories of this iconic Orchestra in innovative, inclusive ways. Previously, at the University of Pennsylvania’s School of Veterinary Medicine (a.k.a. Penn Vet), she worked closely with the School’s first woman Dean; prior to that, she served for several years as director of public relations for the National Constitution Center, where she rubbed elbows with political leaders, pundits, and celebrities. She’s held all of these high-stakes, high-pressure positions before age 40.

In this empowering episode, Ashley shares the secrets of her “joyful” career — including how she follows her passions, leaves self-doubt in the dust (thanks to Sylvia Plath), and finds the courage to raises her voice (sometimes as the only woman in the room). Tune in to hear how Ashley rocks it.

In this episode, you’ll hear:

  • [4:22] How allergies (!) changed the course of Ashley’s career path at Cornell University
  • [4:45] How she aligned her career with her passions
  • [10:26] What empowers Ashley to raise her voice, sometimes as the only woman in the room
  • [12:16] The role of other women as champions and mentors
  • [19:02] How Ashley draws upon her woman’s perspective at work
  • [24:00] Navigating work-life balance
  • [26:02] Ashley’s one tip to rock it (which may involve a tattoo)

Links from the episode:

SHE ROCKED IT is a podcast and virtual community dedicated to raising the volume on women’s voices. We believe that when women listen to, learn from, and lift one another up, we can ALL soar to greater heights.

Episode Transcription:

SHE ROCKED IT // KAREN GROSS:
(00:51) Hey Rockstars, thanks for tuning into the SHE ROCKED IT Podcast, where we’re dedicated to raising the volume on women’s voices. And today I couldn’t be more excited to speak with Ashley Berke. She is the Vice President of Communications at The Philadelphia Orchestra, which is one of the preeminent orchestras in the entire world. She, before that was the Senior Director of Communications and Marketing for the University of Pennsylvania’s School of Veterinary Medicine. And before that ran public relations for the National Constitution Center, which is the only institution in the country dedicated to the U.S. Constitution. So she’s raised her voice on behalf of these distinguished organizations and she’s done so all before age 40, I might add, and sometimes she’s been the only woman in the room. So she’s going to share some insight into how she’s had the courage to raise her voice. And by the way, she has a little secret musical talent, which he doesn’t often talk about. So she’s going to share that with us, along with the many other ways that she ROCKS IT.

So friends, as I was saying, Ashley is a rock star, but what’s really interesting, and why I’m excited about this conversation is that, um, Ashley, uh, in terms of using her voice, uh, often uses her voice on behalf of the organizations that she represents and works for. But nonetheless, she herself is such a brilliant, um, trailblazing rockstar communicator. Yes.

ASHLEY BERKE:
Oh my Gosh

SHE ROCKED IT:
(02:17) Have I embarrassed you? I can tell you’re like, “oh my God, I want”- you want to be promoting something else. You’re going to have to take it, Ashley! Take it in!

ASHLEY BERKE:
It’s so weird. I do this to other people. I never do this.

SHE ROCKED IT:
(02:31). And by the way, let’s let me add- not to embarrass you, but you’re 38 years old and you’ve done all these things. You’re running communications for this incredibly ledge, this legendary orchestra. Um, and you’ve done all these things and really led the communications efforts for these major institutions all before age 40. So the voice leading these efforts of outreach for these major institutions. So how does it feel to yeah, hear, hear about all you’ve done and how you’ve raised her voice?

ASHLEY BERKE:
Honestly, (03:00) it’s so weird. Um, I always make other people do this and I much prefer to make other people do this, but I prepare them and, you know, we’ll have prep sessions before an interview. And I had to like give myself a prep session today, like, “make sure you know what you’re saying,” and, you know, “speak in complete sentences,” and, “don’t make a fool out of yourself”. It’s so weird when it’s for you. And, and then it’s weird to talk about yourself too. Like it’s, I feel like it’s so much easier for me to sit here and if you wanted to talk to me about all the amazing thing that The Orchestra is doing, I could do that for like days and days, but to talk about myself and my life, it’s very, very weird and unsettling, but I’m going to do my best. You make it easy though Kare.

SHE ROCKED IT:
(03:41) Well, I appreciate that. And let me tell you, you’re doing great so far and actually, I think it’s refreshing for you to share how you really feel. You’re not like, “oh, this is no problem. I’m great”. Y- you’re, uh, you know, I think that’s why you’re amazing is that you’re always just you in all these positions too, which is incredibly inspiring to me. And, um, I’ve had the chance to work with Ashley, which we’ll talk about in just a moment. But before we get into that and our intersecting journeys, I just want to hear a little more about why you chose this path, because I know you went to Cornell, undergrad, amazing school. Yeah. And you majored in communications, but you actually had a minor in music, correct?

ASHLEY BERKE:
Yeah. (04:22) Well, actually I can go back even further. So I actually started at Cornell as an Animal Science major. Wanted to be a veterinarian ever since I was like two years old, it was my dream. And so I lasted one semester before my horrible allergies to every animal except for hamsters- so I guess it could have been a hamster specialist (04:41)?

SHE ROCKED IT:
Very different life.

ASHLEY BERKE:
Yes very different life, very niche field  (04:45) Um, yeah, it was really unbearable. And I had to give up that dream. But I had already taken some communications classes because it’s just always been something I’ve been passionate about and enjoyed. And I was like, “you know what, I’m going to switch into this major”. And yeah, the rest is history. But while doing that Music was my concentration because I started playing the piano when I was two, and I also played classical guitar and clarinet in the school orchestra. So music has just been a huge part of my life. And so it’s funny now to see how my jobs have all kind of aligned with my passion. So working at the vet school at Penn was such a dream because it was like, I could be surrounded by veterinarians and the amazing work that I had wanted to do and just promote the heck out of everyone else doing it. (05:31) And then honestly, I thought I would stay at Penn Vet for forever. And I really truly believe the only place that could have lured me away was The Philadelphia Orchestra. Um, because then again, my passion for music, it was like, “all right, this one I have to consider”. And it actually was very hard for me to leave Penn Vet, but you know, as much as I miss the work and the people I’m very happy, The Orchestra is an absolutely unbelievable place to be and to marry my passions and to do communications for a place where you feel so passionately about the work just makes the job so much easier. I’m not sure I could, you know, be pushing something that I didn’t care so much about and be promoting it every day.

SHE ROCKED IT:
What (06:09) I really respect about you is that you’ve continued to find positions throughout your life that seemed to just fit with you and various sides of your personality or sides of you. So how has that, how has that been the case? Have you sought out these positions or have they kind of found you?

ASHLEY BERKE:
Um, (06:26) They kind of found me, but I have to say I was never looking in any of them. So it was that kind of thing where it was like, I wasn’t planning to leave Penn Vet, but when this one popped up and someone recruited me, um, I had to take that moment because it is something I am so passionate about. And I think that that kind of happens for a reason. And I feel really fortunate. I- I’ve only, I’ve only had these three positions, so I’ve only worked at three places in my whole life because when I work somewhere and I feel really, you know, ingrained in the work and I love promoting it, I do want to stay and, you know, give it my all. But I wouldn’t leave for just any other job. And so in each of those instances, it was like, this is the right next move for me. And a good fit and yeah, Penn Vet and The Orchestra just really aligned with everything I love in life and so it just makes going to work such an absolute joy.

SHE ROCKED IT:
(07:19) That is so beautiful. And isn’t that what we all dream about and strive for is to go to work and feel joy? Wow.

ASHLEY BERKE:
(07:25) I feel so fortunate.

SHE ROCKED IT:
(07:28) And you, okay, so I will say that Ashley and I, along her journey, we have had the opportunity to work together. Um, yes, I actually, uh, well, first I was, um, a magazine editor in Philadelphia for a visitor magazine and Ashley at the time was the publicist for the National Constitution Center, very popular visitor destination. And I just could tell on the journalist side that this publicist was doing a kick-ass job. Like,(07:54) you were always sending me all the stuff we needed for the magazine. And then a job came up at the Constitution Center as a communications person there. And I think I sent my resume directly to you.

ASHLEY BERKE:
You did! And I was like, oh, we’re done. I have my person.

SHE ROCKED IT:
I did take a writing test though. I was like in the cafeteria like [inaudible]

ASHLEY BERKE:
Yes, I still made you take the test. I’m so sorry. You passed with flying colors!

SHE ROCKED IT:
(08:22) I appreciate it. No, I appreciate that. And then I actually, that- I will thank you because that was, that position was my introduction to becoming a speechwriter. And I met with the CEO at the time who needed a speechwriter and you. You, and he gave me an opportunity to learn that craft really, you know, trial by fire, which was amazing just in the, in the role.

ASHLEY BERKE:
To (08:40) think that you were learning that on the job is mind-boggling to me because it was just, it came so naturally, you were so good at it. It was so fun to watch you in action.

SHE ROCKED IT:
I appreciate (08:50) that. That’s very kind of you. And I think I had told the CEO at the time- an amazing guy who was a speechwriter himself, um, that I was a cabaret singer and I wrote my own cabaret shows. He didn’t laugh me out of his office in the interview, nor did you. Um, I, uh, so it was kind of combining my writing and performing through speech writing. And of course, you were so supportive. So we had the opportunity to work together at the Constitution Center. And then when I launched my business in 2013, you at that point had moved on to Penn Vet and hired me to edit Penn Vet’s magazine.

ASHLEY BERKE:
I would (09:24) have died without you. I have no idea what I would have done. You saved me. And I mean, anyone out there, if you ever need, like the world’s best storyteller, this is, this is the one right here. I mean, you bring stories to life in the most beautiful ways. I, you just have such, such a skill. It’s amazing. I’ve been-

SHE ROCKED IT:
All of you, (09:45) Ashley, by the way, I’ve not hired Ashley to be my publicist during this interview, but (09:49) I will take these compliments. Thank you. (09:52) Oh my gosh. From this woman, like, this is what SHE ROCKED IT I hope, um, we all feel is like this mutual admiration and respect because I have so much admiration for Ashley. She ha- I really actually view you as an incredible leader and incredible trailblazer. And I’m so grateful that over the years we’ve been able to champion one another in various ways. And I’m curious why you think that’s important in particular or why you as a woman, um, feel it’s important, uh, to have women communicators out there?

ASHLEY BERKE:
(10:26) Oh my gosh, it’s so important. You know, I, I’ve been in some really tense meetings where I’m the only woman in the room and, you know, it’s really easy to want to sit back and keep quiet, but, you know, regardless of your age, your background, what have you, our experiences are worthy and they’re legitimate. And that, you know, the diversity and differences are what deserve to be reflected and represented at all times. And so that’s helped me kind of use my voice in those moments and, you know, having unbelievable female mentors throughout the years. So it’s just really inspired me. And we do, we have this amazing network where we’re just helping each other and lifting each other up and it makes it that much easier to not sit back and keep quiet, which is a very, you know, easy thing to want to resort to in those difficult situations. But our voices deserve to be heard.

SHE ROCKED IT:
(11:18) I couldn’t agree more. And in, in terms of the network that you’re describing, um, I have to also say you, um, one amazing woman, you have connected me to more women than I could possibly count who have, it’s it’s it is truly a network that you have connected me to. One of my, uh, current main clients to the producer of this show, to who then connected me to the audio engineer of SHE ROCKED IT-

ASHLEY BERKE:
(11:45) There are so many talented, unbelievable women out there. And I feel like when we get to know one another, it’s just like, it’s fire. I like with you, Kare. I mean, I met you, I was like 22 in my first job out of college, having no clue what I was doing. And like, from there, like we’ve just lifted each other up all along the way. And it’s so inspiring. No rivalry or a sense of just like any of that nastiness. It’s just women helping women succeed. And it’s really incredible to watch.

SHE ROCKED IT:
(12:16) I love that. And you know, I feel like that whole rivalry cattiness thing in my experience, thank goodness, has been pretty rare. I would say more often than not the women in my life, I’m very grateful for it, have been the greatest champions and truly support. Right. So I feel like that’s, that’s almost like a storyline. You might say that’s yeah,

ASHLEY BERKE:
(12:36)Yeah. People perpetuate this myth, but that’s not been my experience at all.

SHE ROCKED IT:
(12:43) Yeah. Any women in particular that you want to shout out, who’ve been mentors to you or who’ve inspired you to raise your voice?

ASHLEY BERKE:
Yeah. (12:49) You know, I love thinking back to that first job. Cause like I just said, I was 22. I actually started the day after I graduated from school.

SHE ROCKED IT:
And so this is at the National Constitution Center?

ASHLEY BERKE:
Yes, shout out the NCC! And I had no idea what I was doing. And my first boss was Denise Venuti Free. I need to give her a shout-out because I just was in complete awe of her. I remember seeing her in meetings and everyone would just look to her for advice. And she was so strategic and so thoughtful and just watching her share her thoughts, I was like, “I want to be like her”. And then I have to give another shout-out to a colleague we both know and love from the NCC, Tanya Barrientos. Yay Tanya! She’s the best. She’s fearless. She’s brilliant. I mean, to have witness to these women so early in, in my career and to see them in action, just kind of gave me something to aspire to. (13:43) And I learned so much from them. Um, and then going to a place like Penn Vet, where I was surrounded by bad-ass women and you, you got to meet a bunch of them. Um, Dean Joan Hendricks. She was the first woman to serve as Dean of the school. And I think only the third woman to serve as Dean of any veterinary school in the country. So like talk about a trailblazer, um, just unbelievable people everywhere I’ve gone. And yes, many of them have been women who have helped pave the way. And so it feels really special.

SHE ROCKED IT:
(14:14) That’s so interesting. And what’s fascinating that I learned when I was getting to edit the magazine at Penn Vet was that women have now become the majority in terms of who’s going to vet school as I recall and become that. So, and that really switched, I think from the early days of Penn Vet, it was mostly men. Yeah. So really an interesting time to be there.

ASHLEY BERKE:
Yeah. (14:34) And it’s the same thing at The Orchestra. If you look at old pictures of The Orchestra, it’s all white men. Uh, now it’s very heavily female-dominated. We have a long way to go still on, um, diversity of other kinds. But yeah, it’s interesting to see how these male-dominated fields are now being run by women everywhere. I love it.

SHE ROCKED IT:
Yes, (14:53) It’s incredible. And as you said, um, women’s voices are so needed and so important. And I want to talk to you a little more about The Orchestra because yeah. Tell me a little bit about, as the VP of Communications there, what this pivot’s been like for you all to go from in-person performances to the virtual stage, the, uh, you have a new virtual, D uh, uh, subscription that people can engage with. And you’ve done such amazing things, I think, to lift up equity as well and creative equity and to lift up diverse voices via your podcast. Shout out to our mutual producer, Tori Marchiony, who is also your podcast producer and our wonderful producer here at SHE ROCKED IT. So yeah. Tell us about how you’ve sort of pivoted in, in myriad ways, which is not only going virtual, but I think also, uh, being more conscientious and elevating diverse voices.

ASHLEY BERKE:
Absolutely. (15:40) Yeah. I mean, we’ve basically become a digital media organization and we had to do it overnight. So we gave our last concert on March 12th and it was to an empty Verizon Hall, which was really just like chilling. I was like one of the only people sitting in that concert hall and I still get goosebumps just thinking about it. Um, but from that moment we couldn’t have audiences. And so we’ve been, well first we started by doing like “at home” piece-them-together, Brady Bunch-style videos. And then thankfully we were able to safely convene The Orchestra, but distanced onstage with testing and all sorts of rigorous protocols so that we could film performances to put on our Digital Stage because we didn’t want to lose that vital connection with our audiences. It’s just so important. We didn’t want the music to go silent. So we haven’t stopped since the very beginning of the pandemic. (16:30) And it’s been really incredible to see everybody come together. And then, like you said, at the same time we were dealing with this, but also the convergence of everything that we’re, you know, reckoning with on justice, social justice and equity issues. And we knew as an organization that we just could not remain silent, and that music is a really powerful tool for, you know, dealing with these issues. And so, yeah, we started a podcast that Tori has been really instrumental on- no pun intended- um, called HereTOGETHER that talks about creative equity and inclusion through the lens of orchestral music. Um, so we’ve been bringing in amazing artists and activists who’ve been sharing their stories. Um, we’ve done this unbelievable series called Our City Your Orchestra where we go to Black-owned businesses and other cultural institutions throughout the city, as we’re all trying to reemerge from this crisis, and really tell their stories through music. That series has been a lot of fun. Um, but yet institutionally this is we call it IDEAS- inclusion of diversity equity and access strategies. And it’s really fueled by the idea that diversity is excellence. And we know we have a really long way to go in many, many areas, but we’ve been truly committed to this. And the pandemic has given us in some ways, a really beautiful and new ways of getting to know our own communities and reaching new audiences and trying to, in all of our work reflect the diverse audiences that we represent.

SHE ROCKED IT:
(18:02) It’s just incredible to hear that. And thank you for the kind of behind-the-scenes on that. And, um, just to go a little deeper maybe behind-the-scenes, if we can. Um, yeah, I mean, I think some people might, when they think “classical music” or “big orchestra”, that’s been around for a long time, they might think it’s a little stodgy or slow-moving in terms of change and societal change. And here you are doing these things which are, um, seemingly you know, pretty progressive and, and, and really engaging with the community in Philadelphia. Um, and you are, you know, uh, I would say a relatively, maybe young woman, I don’t know what the average age is for your audience, but- has it been challenging at all for you in this environment? Um, again, maybe I’m being stereotypical with how I would envision like an institution like this, but for you as a younger woman, to raise your voice and to try to maybe advocate for some of these kinds of initiatives or to advocate for change, how has that really been for you? Have you had to kind of stand your ground and speak up in ways you weren’t expecting?

ASHLEY BERKE:
Yeah. (19:02) I mean, I have an interesting role in that. You know, I, I do try to draw from my own experiences and yes, I am younger than, uh, the core audience and I try to bring the female perspective always. Um, but I’m also very fortunate in that our leadership and our CEO in particular Matías Tarnopolsky, um, is very, very dedicated to this. And so I don’t feel like when I bring up these issues that it’s like, “oh my gosh, what is this crazy girl thinking?” Um, but because of my role too, as you know, VP of Communications, I do always have to be thinking about “how is this going to look, how is this going to reflect on us?” And so I do have to be hypercritical sometimes of things like, okay, I’m looking at our season. You know, I have to say it, was it my first season at The Orchestra (19:47)? Um, we put out a season without a single female conductor, um, and without a single female composer too, I believe. And it’s been amazing to see this shift and this true, true dedication that’s from all levels of the institution, which is how this gets done. Um, so I don’t feel like I’m ever not heard. Um, but I do feel like with my unique perspective and my role to kind of be the one to help point out some of these, you know, trickier issues, um, we’ve been very, very laser-focused on making sure that everything we’re doing fits into “IDEAS”, um, which I mentioned, and then really just living our values. And that’s been really important.

SHE ROCKED IT:
(20:29) Thank you for sharing that. That’s really interesting to hear. I know you’ve also played a leadership role, um, in the Philadelphia Public Relations Association, the PPRA. Um, so you really, yeah. You’ve been a leader in public relations too, beyond just the jobs you’ve held. You know, you’ve been, uh, the President of this organization. So tell me about stepping into some of those leadership roles and how you feel, why, I should say why you feel it’s important to be a visible presence in the field of communications and most likely a mentor to others who are breaking into the field.

ASHLEY BERKE:
(21:04) Yeah. I mean that, that last comment really hits the nail on the head. I do it because people like Denise and Tanya before me did it for me. And so to have someone you can look up to and help guide you in your career in particular, it’s just so important. And so PPRA the Philadelphia Public Relations Association, um, yeah, that’s why I was on the board for many years and then eventually served as President. And it was all about helping young people in the field and actually started a mentorship program. That’s what I loved about PPRA was just seeing, again, like people lifting other people up and just having that network that you can rely on.

SHE ROCKED IT:
(21:45) And if, um, someone was kind of, if, if a woman was breaking into the field of communications now, I mean, things have changed obviously so much with everything going virtual. Um, is there a tip of some sort on how that woman could really try to, to get her foot in the door?

ASHLEY BERKE:
(22:01) Well, that’s a really good question. Uh, and yeah, now it’s such an interesting time and it feels almost in some ways harder to do networking the way that we’re used to, uh, because you know, PPRA, isn’t having in-person events and normally I would tell them, “join, you’ll come meet people!” It’s hard when you’re meeting on a screen, which isn’t quite the same. Um, but I guess my advice to anybody and it doesn’t have to be exclusive to the communications field is to really get out there and not be afraid to use your voice, meeting people, making those connections, forming that network of your own, because the earlier you start, you’re going to have these people in your corner for life. And that’s, what’s been so exciting to see is, you know, I, I joined these institutions right out of college with people like you right away. And yeah, we’ve all been on a journey now together, and it’s just, it’s inspiring every step of the way.

SHE ROCKED IT:
(22:55) That’s beautiful. And I know personally having worked with you that you work hard and I mean that as a compliment, like I remember your desk was next to mine. You had this row of several pairs of black high heels under your desk. Um, I think you might’ve worn, like Chuck’s- uh, Converse, you know, when you were writing, which I love, but then like you had these beautiful heels under your desk. And of course you’re also, your desk is surrounded with these pictures of the celebrities who had come through the Constitution Center for various events and tours, and you’ve gotten to work with them and they of course fell in love with you and were hugging you in the pictures. And so, but I know you really put in that work, Ashley and I also know that you have a life. I actually had the great honor of attending your wedding and you have an amazing husband and you have a life and you are close with your family. How do you balance this incredible work ethic that I know you have? I mean, you put, you are the last person to leave at the Constitution Center you were putting in that time. How do you balance your work and your life, (23:57) or that’s something you’re still aspiring towards…?

ASHLEY BERKE:
I’m (24:00) not good at that. I have to say, I am not the one to get advice from on that because I’m still figuring it out. And, you know, I’m, I’m trying to do, I’ve tried to be more conscious of it. I have to say during this pandemic, it’s been actually way harder because there are no boundaries. You know, there’s not like the “End of The Workday” where like, you can see that everybody’s office is dark and it’s time to go. You know, we’re getting calls at all hours of the day and you know, we’ve just been in this crazy, “make it happen” mode. And yeah, I’m not the best to give advice on this, but I’m still figuring it out. And that’s okay. And I do try to make time for my lovely husband and our cats and my family and friends. And sometimes, you know, I have to tell people, “I’m going to be disappearing for a while. It’s a crazy, you know, month at work, just bear with me” and then, you know, try to shift the focus when I can. But yeah, it’s a tough balance and I’m still, still working on it.

SHE ROCKED IT:
(24:58) Well, I appreciate your, your honesty. It is a tough balance. And I get that too. And I think when you said earlier that your work is joyful in a way, I mean, it’s like, you’re, you’re, you know, you’re loving it. So you’re in it. You’re kind of committed to it and a lot of ways, and your husband John understands that about you, which is also really beautiful that you, you know, kind of live and breathe what you do cause you’re really passionate about it. So, you know, all that’s really interesting and I appreciate you talking about it. I guess I’d love to end this incredible conversation- I’ve just been so inspired again by you and hearing your journey-and, um, Y you know, you as a woman have, um, not only pioneered your own journey, but also benefited from the leadership of other women, you’ve known, it’s been incredible to hear about some of those women as well. Um, Ashley, if you were willing to share one tip, um, for other women who want to ROCK IT in their careers and callings, as you undoubtedly have, what is ONE TIP TO ROCK IT that you’d like to leave with?

ASHLEY BERKE:
Sure. (26:02) So something I have to remind myself every single day is to not let fear hold you back and to not be afraid to make mistakes, because that is how we learn. And that’s how we grow. I actually have a tattoo that is a quote from one of Sylvia Plath’s journals that has just always stayed with me. And the quote says “the worst enemy to creativity is self-doubt”. So I try not to be held back by that doubt and that striving for perfection, that you’re never going to reach because failure is part of our success. And so try not to hold the- be held back by that. Try not to be paralyzed by doubt, trust your instincts, because that’s when people will see you in the most authentic way. And that’s when (26:46) You shine.

SHE ROCKED IT:
(26:48) That was amazing. First of all, what, where is this tattoo? I mean, we love to see

ASHLEY BERKE:
(26:52) It’s somewhere on my ribs. I’m not going to reveal them, but it’s there. It hurt like, hell

SHE ROCKED IT:
That’s a whole different podcast! (27:04) But that tip just rocked- my mind is blown and this conversation has just made my day.

ASHLEY BERKE:
Oh, I love talking with you, Karen!

SHE ROCKED IT:
Oh, Ashley, thank you so much. And thank you for letting us put the mirror on you (27:16) or the spotlight, because you’re so brilliant.

ASHLEY BERKE:
So unsettling!

SHE ROCKED IT:
(27:23) Well it came off, uh, beautiful. And hopefully it was as joyful as you always putting the spotlight on your amazing institutions that who have been blessed with your voice.

ASHLEY BERKE:
Thank you. Well, (27:32) talking with you is easy and you just always bring a smile to my face. So thank you. Congratulations on SHE ROCKED IT. It’s amazing. Got my mug! ~endorsements~

SHE ROCKED IT:
We could not be more honored to have you as one of our first podcast guests. So to everyone listening, this has been Ashley Berke, who is the extraordinary Vice President of Communications for The iconic Philadelphia Orchestra, former Director of Communications for the University of Pennsylvania Veterinary School, former director of PR for the National Constitution Center. And as you can tell, she’s as down-to-earth kind, forthright and amazing as, as you can get. So it just goes to show also, I will say from my observations of you, that you can truly be yourself, be bring your whole self to work. You have always done that. Um, and that’s inspired me more than you would know.

ASHLEY BERKE:
(28:22) Oh, thank you, Kare. And that means so much to me.

SHE ROCKED IT:
(28:26) Thank you. And thank you for all the ways that you have just propelled me.

ASHLEY BERKE:
(28:29) Oh gosh.

SHE ROCKED IT:
Truly.

ASHLEY BERKE:
(28:31) Thank you. Don’t make me cry at the end, sheesh!

SHE ROCKED IT:
It’s all (28:36) part of it. No, no ribs, but crying is totally okay!

Thanks so much for tuning into the SHE ROCKED IT Podcast. I’m your host, Karen Gross. This episode has been produced by Tori Marchiony and Jake Segelbaum with audio engineering by Teng Chen. The SHE ROCKED IT theme song is by Karen Gross and Tim Motzer. I invite you to join us on Instagram @sherockedit and join our ROCKSTAR NETWORK at sherockedit.com. We hope you’ll add your voice to the conversation because at SHE ROCKED IT, we are dedicated to raising the volume on women’s voices.

© 2021 KAREN GROSS ENTERPRISES, LLC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. |

SITE DESIGN BY UNO DOS TRAE

Privacy policy | 

terms of Use